Brentwood Historic Commission hosting lecture on one of city’s earliest chair makers


Brentwood Historic Commission hosting lecture on one of city’s earliest chair makers

The Brentwood Historic Commission is hosting a free lecture next month at the Brentwood Library about one of the city’s first chair makers.

The Brentwood Historic Commission is hosting a free lecture next month at the Brentwood Library about one of the city’s first chair makers.

Rick Warwick will present “Chairs for Freedom: The Life and Craft of Dick Poynor,” sharing the history of Poynor Chairs in Williamson County and their unique construction techniques.

Richard “Dick” Poynor was born a slave in Halifax County, Virginia, where he lived with a family of well-established craftsmen, who, it is assumed, taught him turning and joinery skills.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860, Poynor obtained his freedom and settled in Williamson County. He became one of the region’s most prolific and accomplished chair makers and earned a living making them, a craft he also taught his son James.

Poynor’s chairs are noted for their gracefully curved mule-ear posts and triple-slat backs, and are in the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and other museums.

Warwick has been a historian for Williamson County’s Heritage Foundation for more than 20 years. He first became interested in local chair makers in 1971, and has since authored books and hosted dozens of exhibits and presentations on historic Williamson County and Middle Tennessee furniture, including hand-made sugar chests, samplers and other local heirlooms.

For the last 40 years, Warwick has collected more than 200 chairs, focusing on the locals who made them in the 19th and early 20th centuries. He is a native of East Tennessee, making his home in Williamson County since 1970. For 23 years he taught history and served as a school librarian in Williamson County Schools.

Warwick has written more than 18 books ranging from community histories, local decorative arts and Williamson County. He has also been the editor of the Williamson County Historical Society’s annual journal since 1989. Currently, he also serves on the board of the African American Heritage Society in Franklin and the Tennessee Historical Commission.

After the event, there will be an open house tour of the Brentwood Room in the Brentwood Library, which contains many historic artifacts and literature about the history of Brentwood.

The event will take place on Sunday, Aug. 28 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Brentwood Library, located at 8109 Concord Road. Light refreshments will be served.

The Brentwood Historic Commission is hosting a free lecture next month at the Brentwood Library about one of the city’s first chair makers.

Rick Warwick will present “Chairs for Freedom: The Life and Craft of Dick Poynor,” sharing the history of Poynor Chairs in Williamson County and their unique construction techniques.

Richard “Dick” Poynor was born a slave in Halifax County, Virginia, where he lived with a family of well-established craftsmen, who, it is assumed, taught him turning and joinery skills.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860, Poynor obtained his freedom and settled in Williamson County. He became one of the region’s most prolific and accomplished chair makers and earned a living making them, a craft he also taught his son James.

Poynor’s chairs are noted for their gracefully curved mule-ear posts and triple-slat backs, and are in the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and other museums.

Warwick has been a historian for Williamson County’s Heritage Foundation for more than 20 years. He first became interested in local chair makers in 1971, and has since authored books and hosted dozens of exhibits and presentations on historic Williamson County and Middle Tennessee furniture, including hand-made sugar chests, samplers and other local heirlooms.

For the last 40 years, Warwick has collected more than 200 chairs, focusing on the locals who made them in the 19th and early 20th centuries. He is a native of East Tennessee, making his home in Williamson County since 1970. For 23 years he taught history and served as a school librarian in Williamson County Schools.

Warwick has written more than 18 books ranging from community histories, local decorative arts and Williamson County. He has also been the editor of the Williamson County Historical Society’s annual journal since 1989. Currently, he also serves on the board of the African American Heritage Society in Franklin and the Tennessee Historical Commission.

After the event, there will be an open house tour of the Brentwood Room in the Brentwood Library, which contains many historic artifacts and literature about the history of Brentwood.

The event will take place on Sunday, Aug. 28 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Brentwood Library, located at 8109 Concord Road. Light refreshments will be served.

The Brentwood Historic Commission is hosting a free lecture next month at the Brentwood Library about one of the city’s first chair makers.

Rick Warwick will present “Chairs for Freedom: The Life and Craft of Dick Poynor,” sharing the history of Poynor Chairs in Williamson County and their unique construction techniques.

Richard “Dick” Poynor was born a slave in Halifax County, Virginia, where he lived with a family of well-established craftsmen, who, it is assumed, taught him turning and joinery skills.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860, Poynor obtained his freedom and settled in Williamson County. He became one of the region’s most prolific and accomplished chair makers and earned a living making them, a craft he also taught his son James.

Poynor’s chairs are noted for their gracefully curved mule-ear posts and triple-slat backs, and are in the collections of the Yale University Art Gallery, the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and other museums.

Warwick has been a historian for Williamson County’s Heritage Foundation for more than 20 years. He first became interested in local chair makers in 1971, and has since authored books and hosted dozens of exhibits and presentations on historic Williamson County and Middle Tennessee furniture, including hand-made sugar chests, samplers and other local heirlooms.

For the last 40 years, Warwick has collected more than 200 chairs, focusing on the locals who made them in the 19th and early 20th centuries. He is a native of East Tennessee, making his home in Williamson County since 1970. For 23 years he taught history and served as a school librarian in Williamson County Schools.

Warwick has written more than 18 books ranging from community histories, local decorative arts and Williamson County. He has also been the editor of the Williamson County Historical Society’s annual journal since 1989. Currently, he also serves on the board of the African American Heritage Society in Franklin and the Tennessee Historical Commission.

After the event, there will be an open house tour of the Brentwood Room in the Brentwood Library, which contains many historic artifacts and literature about the history of Brentwood.

The event will take place on Sunday, Aug. 28 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Brentwood Library, located at 8109 Concord Road. Light refreshments will be served.

About The Author

Kelly Gilfillan is the owner-publisher of Home Page Media Group which has been publishing hyperlocal news since 2009.

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